Stem Cell Therapy for Diabetes

Now Treating

































How Can Placenta Stem Cell Therapy (PST) Help Diabetes and Related Conditions?

What is diabetes?

According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism— the way the body uses digested food for growth and energy. Most of the food people eat is broken down into glucose, the form of sugar in the blood. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body.
After digestion, glucose passes into the bloodstream, where it is used by cells for growth and energy. For glucose to get into cells, insulin must be present. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach.

When people eat, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells. In people with diabetes, however, the pancreas either produces little or no insulin, or the cells do not respond appropriately to the insulin that is produced. Glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body in the urine. Thus, the body loses its main source of fuel even though the blood contains large amounts of glucose.

What are the types of diabetes?

The three main types of diabetes are:
  • Type 1 Diabetes
  • Type 2 Diabetes 
  • gestational diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease results when the body’s system for fighting infection—the immune system—turns against a part of the body. In diabetes, the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. The pancreas then produces little or no insulin. A person who has Type 1 Diabetes must take insulin daily to live.

At present, scientists do not know exactly what causes the body’s immune system to attack the beta cells, but they believe that autoimmune, genetic, and environmental factors, possibly viruses, are involved. Type 1 Diabetes accounts for about 5 to 10 percent of diagnosed diabetes in the United States. It develops most often in children and young adults but can appear at any age.

Symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes usually develop over a short period, although beta cell destruction can begin years earlier. Symptoms may include increased thirst and urination, constant hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, and extreme fatigue. If not diagnosed and treated with insulin, a person with Type 1 Diabetes can lapse into a life-threatening diabetic coma, also known as diabetic ketoacidosis.

Type 2 Diabetes

The most common form of diabetes is Type 2 Diabetes. About 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have Type 2. This form of diabetes is most often associated with older age, obesity, family history of diabetes, previous history of gestational diabetes, physical inactivity, and certain ethnicities. About 80 percent of people with Type 2 Diabetes are overweight or obese.

Type 2 Diabetes is increasingly being diagnosed in children and adolescents, especially among African American, Mexican American, and Pacific Islander youth.

When Type 2 Diabetes is diagnosed, the pancreas is usually producing enough insulin, but for unknown reasons the body cannot use the insulin effectively, a condition called insulin resistance. After several years, insulin production decreases. The result is the same as for Type 1 Diabetes—glucose builds up in the blood and the body cannot make efficient use of its main source of fuel.

The symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes develop gradually. Their onset is not as sudden as in Type 1 Diabetes. Symptoms may include fatigue, frequent urination, increased thirst and hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, and slow healing of wounds or sores. Some people have no symptoms.

Gestational Diabetes

Some women develop gestational diabetes late in pregnancy. Although this form of diabetes usually disappears after the birth of the baby, women who have had gestational diabetes have a 40 to 60 percent chance of developing Type 2 Diabetes within 5 to 10 years. Maintaining a reasonable body weight and being physically active may help prevent development of Type 2 Diabetes.

About 3 to 8 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes. As with Type 2 Diabetes, gestational diabetes occurs more often in some ethnic groups and among women with a family history of diabetes. Gestational diabetes is caused by the hormones of pregnancy or a shortage of insulin. Women with gestational diabetes may not experience any symptoms.

What is pre-diabetes?

People with pre-diabetes have blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. This condition raises the risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

Pre-diabetes is also called impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), depending on the test used to diagnose it. Some people have both IFG and IGT.
IFG is a condition in which the blood glucose level is high-100 to 125 mg/dL-after an overnight fast, but is not high enough to be classified as diabetes. The former definition of IFG was 110 mg/dL to 125 mg/dL.
IGT is a condition in which the blood glucose level is high—140 to 199 mg/dL—2-hours after a meal, but is not high enough to be classified as diabetes.

Pre-diabetes is becoming more common in the United States. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services estimates that at least 57 million U.S. adults ages 20 or older had pre-diabetes in 2007. Those with pre-diabetes are likely to develop Type 2 Diabetes within 10 years, unless they take steps to prevent or delay diabetes.

The good news is that people with pre-diabetes can do a lot to prevent or delay diabetes. Studies have clearly shown that people can lower their risk of developing diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of their body weight through diet and increased physical activity. A major study of more than 3,000 people with IGT (impaired glucose tolerance) found that diet and exercise resulting in a 5 to 7 percent weight loss—about 10 to 14 pounds in a person who weighs 200 pounds— lowered the incidence of Type 2 Diabetes by nearly 60 percent. Study participants lost weight by cutting fat and calories in their diet and by exercising—most chose walking—at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week.

What are the scope and impact of diabetes?

Diabetes is widely recognized as one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. In 2006, it was the seventh leading cause of death. However, diabetes is likely to be underreported as the underlying cause of death on death certificates. In 2004, among people ages 65 years or older, heart disease was noted on 68 percent of diabetes-related death certificates; stroke was noted on 16 percent of diabetes-related death certificates for the same age group.

Diabetes is associated with long-term complications that affect almost every part of the body. The disease often leads to blindness, heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputations, and nerve damage. Uncontrolled diabetes can complicate pregnancy, and birth defects are more common in babies born to women with diabetes.
In 2007, diabetes cost the United States $174 billion. Indirect costs, including disability payments, time lost from work, and reduced productivity, totaled $58 billion. Direct medical costs for diabetes care, including hospitalizations, medical care, and treatment supplies, totaled $116 billion.

How Can Placenta Stem Cell Therapy (PST)
Help Diabetes and Diabetic Conditions?

PST is intended as an improvement on ones condition. It is not a “cure all” or “miracle pill.” We have performed thousands of procedures with positive results but of course results will vary according to each individual patient's existing conditions and lifestyle (attitude, stress, diet, exercise, etc.)! The Placenta stem cell and related protocol for DIABETES and related disorders is designed to be used with conventional medicine to give you the best of both.

PST takes an overall system-approach to combating the wide variety of diabetes symptoms and underlying causes. Placenta / Stem Cell Therapy (PST) and their unique growth factors have a positive health impact on diabetes related issues because they enhance, repair and regenerate these three major biological systems in the body:

IMMUNE SYSTEM: (IMMUNOMODULATING THERAPY)
The scientific community is focusing much attention on this complex system because so many illnesses result from aberrations in this area. These are the auto-immune diseases (Rheumatoid arthritis, Lupus, Multiple sclerosis etc.) Many conditions like tuberculosis (TB), shingles or chronic infections start when the Immune system is down because of many conditions such as stress, steroid therapy, cancer therapy, or AIDS. PST provides all the vital substances and growth factors but without the toxicity due to their perfect balance in an organ (placenta) that is not designed or manipulated by humans. These substances, along with the increase in "Natural Killer" (NK) cells (these cells are responsible to attack cancerous or infected cells while they are circulating in our body) reset the Immune system the way it was when we were younger.

If this system is in top condition, the degenerative illnesses are delayed or stopped, the auto-immune conditions are helped and chronic infections are better controlled.

HORMONAL SYSTEM:
Studies done in men and women have shown that after the placenta is implanted, the hormonal profile is reset to the way it was years before. In men, there is a noticeable improvement of the initial rates of male hormones, and a new glandular balance that gives more energy and increases the libido. Recent discoveries about Prostate enlargement involve an alteration in sexual hormones as the main reason the prostate grows out of control. This explains why the PST can help this condition tremendously.

In women, the treatment appears to be an interesting alternative to Estrogen Replacement Therapy, given that there is a conversion of minor androgens to estrogen, and an increased secretion of progesterone without the possible side effects.

The fact that the placenta has so many Growth factors, explains why Placenta Stem Cell (PSC) patients are noticing the same improved anti-aging benefits usually attributed to HGH replacement therapy, such as:

Increased resistance to common illnesses, higher energy levels, better memory, increase of muscle mass and diminished visceral fat, preserved or improved bone density, lowered blood pressure, increased exercise performance, etc.

CIRCULATION SYSTEM:
As we all know, the most important nutrients that the body needs to be alive and healthy are, Oxygen and Glucose, and those are delivered by millions of blood vessels all over the body. With aging the circulation becomes less efficient, and if you add other factors like smoking, being sedentary, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and other lipids, the result is that very important organs like the brain, heart, skin and ultimately the whole body suffers the effects of that inefficiency: poor memory, drier and paler skin, no energy and basically all the signs of aging appear. One of the first signals of improvement with PSC therapy is that the skin color becomes pinker and warmer after just two or three days of the implants, and the skin texture is better in just 3 to 4 weeks. That effect could be explained because of the Vascular Growth Factors that the placenta has along with the millions of Stem Cells.

By enhancing, repairing and regenerating these 3 main systems of the body, in addition to the regenerative placenta stem cells and growth factors, diabetes sufferers have the potential to receive remarkable improvements in their overall condition and quality of life. 

If you, a loved one, or someone you know suffers from diabetes, click here to fill out our short information form to see if you are a candidate for placenta stem cell therapy.
At the Optimum Health Regeneration Center, we focus on the best options to treat the source of your condition that will improve the quality of your life NOW and in the future!
Website Builder